Type: Book

Understanding and optimising the nutraceutical properties of fruit and vegetables

Editors

Dr Victor Preedy is Professor of Clinical Biochemistry and Pathology at King’s College Hospital and Emeritus Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry at King’s College London, UK. Amongst many honours, Professor Preedy is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology, the Royal Society of Public Health, the Royal College of Pathologists and the Royal Society of Chemistry. He has published over 750 articles which includes numerous books on a wide range of topics related to the impact of nutrition on health and disease.

Dr Vinood Patel is Reader in Clinical Biochemistry in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Westminster and a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Dr Patel is internationally-known for his research on nutrition, biomarkers and liver disease, and has published over 150 articles and edited numerous books on diet, nutrition and health.

Dimensions:

229x152mm
6x9"

Publication date:

23 August 2022

Length of book:

400 pages

ISBN-13: 9781786768506

Hardback - £150.00
£150.00
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Description

As populations in many developed countries age and the burden of chronic disease increases, there remains a need to establish effective preventative measures. Fruit and vegetables are a natural source of vitamins and minerals which can contribute to good health.

Understanding and optimising the nutraceutical properties of fruit and vegetables reviews the associated health benefits of key horticultural crops, including apples, broccoli and cranberries. The book provides authoritative discussions on the nutraceutical properties of the major phytochemical compounds, including antioxidants and flavonoids, and how these properties can be optimised to prevent the onset of chronic diseases.

By providing a comprehensive insight into the human health benefits of fruit and vegetables, the book highlights the emergence of a more sustainable, alternative method to preventing the onset of disease with less reliance on overburdened healthcare systems.

Key features

  • Provides a comprehensive overview of the wealth of research on analysing, understanding and optimising the nutraceutical properties of fruit and vegetables, focussing primarily on phytochemicals/phytochemical compounds 
  • Reviews the current research on mechanisms of action and the potential role of key phytochemical compounds, such as antioxidants and flavonoids, in preventing the onset of chronic diseases 
  • Explores current advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of key horticultural crops, including apples, cranberries, broccoli and other brassicas

Table of contents

Part 1 Phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables: polyphenols
1.Advances in understanding the nutraceutical properties of antioxidants in fruits and vegetables: Amit K. Jaiswal, Technological University Dublin, Ireland;
2.Advances in understanding the nutraceutical properties of phenolic compounds in fruits and vegetables: Giuseppina Pace Pereira Lima, Sao Paolo State University, Brazil;
3.Understanding the nutraceutical properties of flavonoids in fruits and vegetables: chemical structure and groups: A. D. Diwan, MGM's Institute of Bioscience and Technology - Mahatma Gandhi Mission, India;
4.Understanding the nutraceutical properties of flavonoids in fruits and vegetables: mechanisms of action: A. D. Diwan, MGM's Institute of Bioscience and Technology - Mahatma Gandhi Mission, India;

Part 2 Phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables: glucosinolates and organosulfur compounds
5.Understanding the nutraceutical properties of glucosinolates and their breakdown products: classification and sources: Amit K. Jaiswal, Technological University Dublin, Ireland;
6.Understanding the nutraceutical properties of glucosinolates: mechanisms of action: Amit K. Jaiswal, Technological University Dublin, Ireland;
7.Understanding the health benefits and nutraceutical properties of organosulfur compounds in vegetables: Amit K. Jaiswal, Technological University Dublin, Ireland;

Part 3 Phytochemicals and the prevention of disease
8.Advances in understanding the role of plant phytochemicals in preventing cancer: Gulsun A. Evrendilek, Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal University, Turkey;
9.Advances in understanding the role of plant phytochemicals in preventing cardiovascular disease: Monique S. J. Simmonds, Royal Botanic Gardens, UK;

Part 4 Analysing and optimising phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables
10.Advances in screening/analysis of phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables: Aline Alberti, State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil;
11.Agronomic factors affecting phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables: Xiao Yang, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China;
12.Understanding processing of phytochemical compounds in fruits and vegetables in the gut: Stan Kubow, McGill University, Canada;

Part 5 Case studies
13.Advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of cranberries: Oliver Chen, Biofortis – Mérieux NutriSciences, USA;
14.Advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of apples: Lia N. Gerschenson, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina;
15.Advances in understanding and improving the nutraceutical properties of broccoli and other brassicas: Elsa Goncalves, Instituto Nacional de Investigacao Agraria e Veterinaria (INIAV), Portugal;