Type: Book

Understanding and improving crop root function

Editor

Dr Peter Gregory is Emeritus Professor of Global Food Security at the University of Reading, UK, where he was previously Professor of Soil Science. Amongst many distinctions, Professor Gregory is a former President of the International Society of Root Research (ISRR) as well as former Chief Executive of the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now part of the James Hutton Institute) and East Malling Research (now NIAB-EMR). He is internationally-renowned for his research in soil and crop root science.

Dimensions:

229x152mm
6x9"

Publication date:

29 December 2020

Length of book:

440 pages

ISBN-13: 9781786763600

Hardback - £180.00
£180.00
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Description

Recent decades have seen a dramatic increase in research on plant roots. A deeper understanding of the complex ways roots interact with soils is making it possible to ‘design’ roots to optimise nutrient/water uptake in low-input environments, as well as deliver other benefits such as improved soil health and reduced nutrient leaching. Continued research is needed in this important area so that it can contribute to more sustainable, ‘climate-smart’ crop production.

Understanding and improving crop root function features authoritative reviews of current research in all aspects of root science, including root growth regulators, root anatomy, nutrient acquisition and root system architecture. This collection discusses the responses of plant roots to abiotic and biotic stresses and how understanding nutrient uptake can be exploited to optimise root function. The book concludes with a dedicated section on methods used to improve crop root function and crop nutrient use efficiency, such as the use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR).

With its eminent editor and international array of expert authors, Understanding and improving crop root function will be a standard reference for university researchers in crop physiology and nutrition, government and other agencies supporting agriculture, companies supplying crop nutrition products and services, as well as farmers.

Key features

  • Comprehensive review of key topics in root science, including root architecture, root growth regulators, root anatomy and nutrient acquisition 
  • Coverage of root response to both biotic and abiotic variables 
  • Discusses the range of techniques to optimize root function, from phenotyping to identify desirable root traits and exploiting the genetics of root traits to the use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM)

What others are saying...

"The proposed book is timely and highly relevant, given the advances accomplished in this topic over recent years. Its content provides a comprehensive compilation of current knowledge by well-recognized experts in the field. This book promises to be a standard reference for scientists and students in plant and agricultural science around the world. Congratulations."
Dr Philippe Hinsinger, Head of Environment and Agronomy Division, INRA, France

"This book brings together the foremost scientists in plant root research and promises to be a unique one-stop reference for the latest in root research. The chapters and topics are timely and important in exploiting our understanding of plant roots to help solve the resource challenges facing agriculture."
Professor Michelle Watt, University of Bonn, Germany; Director - Institute of Bio and Geosciences 2 (IBG-2), Germany; President of the International Society of Root Research

Table of contents

Part 1 Analysing root system architecture, growth and interactions with the rhizosphere
1.Advances in root architectural modeling: Johannes A. Postma, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany; and Christopher K. Black, The Pennsylania State University, USA;
2.The development of crop root architecture to optimise nutrition acquisition: the case of rice: Tom Beeckman, University of Ghent, Belgium;
3.Advances in understanding plant root growth regulators: Amanda Rasmussen, University of Nottingham, UK;
4.Advances in understanding plant root anatomy and nutrient acquisition: Dimitris Bouranis, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece;
5.Advances in understanding plant root hairs and nutrient acquisition: Tim George, James Hutton Institute, UK;
6.Advances in understanding plant root interactions with rhizobacteria: Ulrike Mathesius, Australian National University, Australia;
7.Advances in understanding arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi/endophytic fungi: Jeff Powell, University of Western Sydney, Australia;

Part 2 Root response to biotic threats
8.Advances in understanding plant root response to parasites: Diego Rubiales, CSIC, Spain;
9.Advances in understanding plant root response to root-feeding insects: Scott Johnson, University of Western Sydney, Australia;
10.Advances in understanding plant root response to nematode attack: John Jones, James Hutton Institute, UK;

Part 3 Root uptake of nutrients and water
11.Advances in understanding plant root uptake of nitrogen (N) uptake: Malcolm Hawkesford, Rothamsted Research, UK;
12.Advances in understanding plant root uptake of phosphorus (P) uptake: Hans Lambers, University of Western Australia, Australia;
13.Advances in understanding plant root water uptake: Andrea Carminati, University of Bayreuth, Germany;

Part 4 Improving root function
14.Understanding and exploiting the genetics of plant root traits: Roberto Tuberosa, University of Bologna, Italy;
15.The use of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) to improve root function/crop nutrient use efficiency: Louise Nelson, University of British Columbia, Canada;
16.The use of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to improve root function/crop nutrient use efficiency: Tim Daniell, University of Sheffield, UK;
17.Improving deep rooting in crop plants: John Kirkegaard, CSIRO, Australia;
18.Rootstocks to improve root function/crop nutrient use efficiency: Ian Dodd, Lancaster University, UK;
19.Understanding and improving phosphorus acquisition by root systems in pasture and arable crops: Richard Simpson, CSIRO, Australia;